About the CogAT

  • Verbal Reasoning

    The verbal section of CogAT® will measure Oral Vocabulary, Verbal Reasoning, Sentence Completion (grade 3 and up), and Verbal Analogies (grade 3 and up).

     

    Verbal Classification:

    The student is given a list of three words that are alike in some way. The student is asked to choose a word (from a selection of five words) that is alike in the same way.

    Example:   GREEN    BLUE    RED  

    The answer choices are:

      • color
      • crayon
      • paint
      • yellow
      • rainbow

     

    Sentence Completion:

    The student is given a sentence with a word left out and is asked to choose a word that makes the best sense in the sentence.

    Example: Apples _______ on trees.

    The answer choices are:

      • fall
      • grow
      • show
      • bloom
      • spread

     

    Verbal Analogies:

    The student is given three words. The first two words go together. The third word goes with one of the answer choices. The student is asked to choose the word that goes with the third word the same way that the second word goes with the first.

    Example: new (is to) old : wet (is to) ________

    The answer choices are:

      • rain
      • drip
      • hot
      • sun
      • dry
  • Nonverbal Reasoning

    In this section, Figure Classification, Matrices (K-2), Figural Analysis, and Figural Classification are assessed. This part of the test often presents the most novel problems to students. The items on these tests use only geometric shapes and figures that have had little direct relationship to formal school instruction. The tests require no reading and no prior knowledge.

     

    Figure Classification:

    The students are given three figures that are alike in some way. They are given three answer choices and five pictures to choose from. They are asked to decide which figure goes best with the three answer choices.

    Example: the student is given three items that are oddly shaped but each one has 4 sides and is black. The choices are:

      • a black circle
      • a black triangle
      • a 4-sided white object
      • a black 4-sided object
      • a six-sided white object

     

    Figure Analogies:

    The student is given three figures. The first two figures go together; the third figure goes with one of the answer choices.

    Example: The first two figures are a large square that goes together with a small square. The second pair is to go together the same way that the first two figures go together. For the second pair students are given a large circle.

    The choices are:

      • a small triangle
      • a large circle
      • a small square
      • a small circle
      • a large rectangle

     

    Figure Analysis (Paper Folding):

    The student is shown how a square piece of dark paper is folded and where holes are punched in it. The student is to figure out how the paper will look when it is unfolded.

    Example: If a dark piece of paper is folded in the center from top to bottom and a hole is punched in the bottom right-hand corner, what will the piece of paper look like when it is unfolded?

    The answer choices are:

      • one hole in the bottom right-hand corner
      • one hole in the bottom right-hand corner and one in the top right-hand corner
      • one hole in the top right-hand corner
      • one hole in the bottom right-hand corner and one in the bottom left-hand corner
      • one hole in the bottom right-hand corner and one in the top left-hand corner

     

  • Quantitative Reasoning

    This section isn’t just about math facts, it’s more about thinking numerically and problem-solving with numbers.

     

    Number Series:

    Students are presented with a series of number and they are required to determine which number should follow in the series.

    Example: 1   2   4   5   7   8   

    The answer choices are:

      • 7
      • 8
      • 9
      • 10
      • 11

     

    Number Puzzles:

    Students are required to solve simple equations by choosing the answer choice that makes the amounts on either side of the equal sign the same.

    Example: ? = 2 + 3

    The answer choices are:

      • 2
      • 3
      • 4
      • 5
      • 6



    Number Analogies:

    The student is given two complete sets of numbers and then a third set with a missing number. The student must understand what the similarity is in the first two sets of numbers and apply that equation to the set with the missing number.

    Example:

    [2 to 5]     [4 to 9]     [3 to ?]

    The answer choices are:

      • 4
      • 5
      • 6
      • 7
      • 8