• Gr. 6 State-Mandated Immunizations


    ATTENTION Parents of Incoming 6th Students:
     
    Effective September 1, 2008 for sixth grade students, schools must now require proof of:
    • one dose of the meningococcal conjugate vaccine, and
    • one dose of the Tdap vaccine

    Documentation of these two immunizations must be received by the Lincoln Roosevelt Health Office.  If you have questions, please contact Dorothy Fagerlin, RN, BSN, CSN at Lincoln Roosevelt:  dfagerlin@roxbury.org or 973-584-2805.
     
     
    The amended regulations in N.J.A.C. 8:57-4 pertaining to these two immunization requirements state the following:
     
    One dose of Meningococcal Vaccine
    8:57-4.20 Meningococcal vaccine
    • (a) Every child born on or after January 1, 1997, and entering or attending Grade Six or a comparable age level special education program with an unassigned grade on or after September 1, 2008, shall have received one dose of a meningococcal-containing vaccine, such as the medically-preferred meningococcal conjugate vaccine.*

      *Please note: This applies to students when they turn 11 years of age and attending Grade Six.


    • (b)  Every child born on or after January 1, 1997, and transferring into a New Jersey school from another state or country on or after September 1, 2008, shall have received one dose of meningococcal vaccine.
     
     

    One dose of Tdap Vaccine
    8:57-4.10 Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine
    • (h) Every child born on or after January 1, 1997, and entering or attending Grade Six, or a comparable age level special education program with an unassigned grade on or after September 1, 2008, shall have received one dose of Tdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis) given no earlier than the 10th birthday.+

      +Additional note from the Lincoln Roosevelt Health Office:  Some Tdap preparations may only be given after the 11th birthday. Immunization type is dependent upon what your pediatrician stocks in his office, (ie. Boostrix/Adacel).


    • (i) Children entering or attending Grade Six on or after September 1, 2008, who received a Td booster dose less than five years prior to entry or attendance shall not be required to receive a Tdap dose until five years have elapsed from the last DTP/DTaP or Td dose.^

    • (j) Children born on or after January 1, 1997, and transferring into a New Jersey school from another state or country after September 1, 2008, shall have received one dose of Tdap, provided at least five years have elapsed from the last documented Td dose.^ 

      ^Additional note from the Lincoln Roosevelt Health OfficeIf a Tetanus immunization, (DTP/DTaP or Td) dose has been administered in the last five years, documentation must be received by the Lincoln Roosevelt Health Office.
     
     

     
     

  • Additional info:  Meningococcal Disease & Vaccine

    Source:  US Dept. of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration:  https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/; The National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health (NIOSH): https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/bbp/
     
     
    What is meningococcal disease?
    Meningococcal disease refers to any illness caused by the type of bacteria (germs) called Neisseria meningitidis.  Meningococcal disease may result in inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) and/or a serious blood infection (septicemia).
     
    About 5-20% of people carry this type of bacteria in their nose and throat and do not get sick from them.  But sometimes, Neisseria meningitidis can invade the body and cause meningococcal disease.
     
    How can meningococcal disease be prevented?
    • The best way to prevent meningococcal disease is to get vaccinated.  There are two kinds of vaccines available that protect against 4 types of meningococcal disease known as A, C, Y, and W.  There is a new vaccine that was just licensed to help prevent type B.

    • In New Jersey, meningococcal vaccine is required for 11-year-olds attending school and is required for certain students who are enrolled in a college or university and reside on campus. 

     For more information:
    • Click here for a meningococcal educational brochure provided by the New Jersey Dept. of Health (NJDOH).

    • Click here for a booklet of Questions & Answers on Immunization Regulations pertaining to children attending school, prepared by the NJDOH.  Information pertaining specifically to the meningococcal vaccine begins at the bottom of page 13.

    • Refer to:  N.J.A.C. 8:57-4 and N.J.A.C. 8:57-6.

    • Click here for the parent page maintained by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention that explains the meningococcal disease and vaccine.
     
     

  • Additional info:  Tdap Vaccine & the diseases it protects against

    Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/teen/tdap.html; NJ Dept. of Health:  https://www.nj.gov/health/cd/imm.shtml
     
     
    Why does my child need Tdap vaccine?
    Babies and little kids get shots called DTaP to protect them from diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough). But as kids get older, the protection from the DTaP shots starts to wear off. This can put your preteen or teen at risk for serious illness.
     
    The tetanus-diphtheria-acelluar pertussis (Tdap) vaccine is a booster shot that helps protect your preteen or teen from the same diseases that DTaP shots protect little kids from:
    • Tetanus is caused by a toxin (poison) made by bacteria found in soil. The bacteria enter the body through cuts, scratches, or puncture wounds in the skin. Tetanus can cause spasms, which are painful muscle cramps in the jaw muscle (lockjaw) and throughout the body. The spasms can cause breathing problems and paralysis. A preteen or teen with tetanus could spend weeks in the hospital in intensive care. As many as 1 out of 5 people who get tetanus dies.

    • Diphtheria is not as common as tetanus but can be very dangerous. It spreads from person to person through coughing or sneezing. It causes a thick coating on the back of the nose or throat that can make it hard to breathe or swallow. It can also cause paralysis and heart failure. About 1 out of 10 people who get diphtheria will die from it.

    • Pertussis (whooping cough) spreads very easily through coughing and sneezing. It can cause a bad cough that makes someone gasp for air after coughing fits. This cough can last for many weeks, which can make preteens and teens miss school and other activities. Whooping cough can be deadly for babies who are too young to have protection from their own vaccines. Often babies get whooping cough from their older brothers or sisters, like preteens or teens, or other people in the family.

    There are two vaccines for tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis (Tdap).  What is the difference between these vaccines?
    The Tdap vaccines are made by two different manufacturers and are licensed for different age groups:
    • Boostrix by GlaxoSmithKline is licensed for ages 10 and older.
    • Adacel  by Sanofi Pasteur is licensed for ages 10 through 64.
    The Tdap vaccine provides protection from pertussis as immunity to pertussis wanes over time.
     
    Some 6th graders will not be 11 years old.  Would a 10 year old not have to be in compliance with the 6th grade Tdap requirement until he or she reaches 11?   
    Yes, a 10 year old would not be required to receive the Tdap vaccine until 11 years of age per NJ’s immunization regulations. Although both Tdap vaccines, Boostrix and Adacel, are licensed for use beginning at age 10, NJ would not require Tdap for school attendance under the child is 11 years of age. The Department recommends the dose be received within two weeks of the 11th birthday

      For more information:
       
      • Click here for a booklet of Questions & Answers on Immunization Regulations pertaining to children attending school, prepared by the NJDOH.  Information pertaining specifically to the Tdap vaccine begins on page 11.

      • Refer to:  N.J.A.C. 8:57-4 and N.J.A.C. 8:57-6.

      • Click here for the parent page maintained by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention that explains the Tdap vaccine and the diseases it protects against.
       
       

    • Additional info:  Immunization Requirements for School-Age Youth


      • Click here for the immunization requirements children must have in order to enter/attend/transfer into the Roxbury Township School District.

      • For FAQs and fact sheets that help explain immunizations / vaccines and recommended schedules for children, click here to visit the parent page featuring this information, maintained by the Centers of Disease Control & Prevention.